Holy @#!& - Our website's domain name was just hijacked

Disponible en anglais seulement

This past year, there have been several high-profile global DNS hijackings. Attacks are on the rise and nobody is particularly safe. 

Disponible en anglais seulement

This past year, there have been several high-profile global DNS hijackings. Whether Google in Vietnam or the smoking lizard that appeared on Air Malaysia's website, these common malicious activities can make headlines when hackers target big brands or high-traffic websites. 

Attacks can also happen closer to home, as the team running the City of Ottawa's website learned earlier this year when this seemingly sleepy government town fell victim to domain hijacking.

All types of Internet attacks are on the rise and nobody is particularly safe. Why? Frankly, because these tactics are effective at generating media awareness to deliver a message.

Last month we contributed an article to Municipal World Magazine to help Canadian cities, towns, and yes, even villages understand what a hijacking is and how they can prevent one. 

Any municipality can be the victim of a domain hijacking. Until a website is restored, a domain hijacking is a full-on emergency for a municipality. In addition to redirecting the website, email is also impacted. During a domain name hijacking, all email sent to the organization under attack is either dropped or, worse, can be intercepted by the attacker. While the IT team works to analyze and neutralize the attack, municipal officials must prepare a media response. The scrutiny from the media and public is intensive and lasts well beyond the hijacking. 

The solution to this threat includes .CA Registry Lock, which we explore in the article. 

 

Download the article "Holy @#!&! Our Website's domain name was just hijacked!" here. 

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